Image Source

Music videos and video games are two of our favorite entertainment options.

At least they have been since the pandemic, and while we were surfing those old songs, we came across an interesting aspect.

Did you know there are many music videos that are inspired by video games?

We bet you didn’t.

But there are, and we have compiled the list of the top 7 music videos that took inspiration from our favorite video games.

If you don’t believe us, you can download the music video and the game from https://thenewpiratebay.org/ and check. 

Now, let’s start with the list: 

1: Californication: Red Hot Chili Peppers

There’s no denying the impact of the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ video for Californication, whether it’s a throwback to a bygone age or a long-form ode to video games. 

Each band member embarks on their own unique adventure based on various video game genres throughout the video. 

The music video does a fantastic job of capturing early polygon gaming, whether it’s following John Frusciante leaping and evading celebrities or Anthony Kiedis driving about in a convertible. 

This video is thorough and fascinating, with a genre-defying climax finish and a calming tune to accompany it.

2: Move Your Feet: Junior Senior

This is the epitome of unpredictability. 

Junior-Senior enlisted the help of the art group Shynola to create a music video for their track ‘Move Your Feet.’ 

Each random scenario of Junior Senior and company dancing was portrayed via low-resolution images, while Shynola crafted a pixel art homage to games from early Atari platforms. 

It’s a display like no other, culminating in glorious chaos, thanks to the random character of events — a squirrel mounts a horse, a pineapple dance, and so on.

3: We Come Together: Goldfish Feat. Sakhile Moleshe

This is an interesting mix of game components. 

The kidnapping of a lady who looks like Princess Peach begins the music video for Goldfish’s ‘We Come Together.’ 

Following that, the band – together with their goldfish mascot – explore a pixel-art recreation of various vintage gaming locations. 

To fit the band’s easy-going pace, animator Mike Scott draws on everything from Pitfall to Duck Hunt, even slipping in more recent gaming allusions. 

4: Don’t Deny Your Heart: Hot Chip

In the tradition of the FIFA and PES series, ‘Don’t Deny Your Heart’ is a soccer simulation game. 

Everything points to this film being an homage to sports games, from the occasional usage of overhead viewpoints to the appearance of the 3D graphics being employed.

It also helps that the film depicts the band Hot Chip’s responses to the ‘game’ on a regular basis, maybe as a further tribute to the pervasiveness of gaming as a pastime.

5: The Spike: The Music

This music video produces an impression based on a single source of inspiration. The video for ‘The Spike’ begins in a cutting-edge facility where a massive particle accelerator is being tested. 

When the accelerator is turned on, it zaps a man and a woman, transporting them into a 3D recreation of a computerized world akin to TRON from 1982. 

With the visceral arcade-like aspect of certain sequences, there’s enough motivation to watch the whole thing.

6: Do The Whirlwind: Architecture In Helsinki

This 16-bit style video for ‘Do the Whirlwind,’ by Australian indie pop band Architecture in Helsinki, suggests that was the intention. 

The video’s main events revolve around a group of stylized characters walking to a beach party, which primarily serves as a background for some spectacular sceneries and scenes. 

The usage of pixel graphics here is brilliant, perfectly portraying the quirky yet loving essence of each character, and it fully reflects the genuine quirkiness of Golden Age gaming.

7: Say You Like Me: We The Kings

This strange yet heartfelt video was created for the band’s second single off their third album Sunshine State of Mind. 

The idea is straightforward: a member of the band catches a girl’s eye— only to see her abduction by 2D sprite-style baddies. 

The song itself begins with the band going toe-to-toe with the baddies in a series of parts that range in influence from musical games to one-on-one combat games. 

The feeling of purpose, which is clearly portrayed via both the song and its visual equivalent, remains continuous. 

Closing Note

We are sure you have heard these songs before, but you did not know the videos were inspired by video games, right?

Well, now you do.

So browse these songs once again and see them from a different perspective this time.

For further questions, ask us below. 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.